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Beginning Linux Programming, 4th Edition (0470147628) cover image

Beginning Linux Programming, 4th Edition

Neil Matthew, Richard Stones
ISBN: 978-0-470-14762-7
Paperback
816 pages
November 2007
View Previous Edition of This Title
Other Available Formats: E-book
If you are an instructor, you may request an evaluation copy for this title.
Paperback Version: US $39.99 Add to Cart

Do you think you've discovered an error in this book? Please check the list of errata below to see if we've already addressed the error. If not, please submit the error via our Errata Form. We will attempt to verify your error; if you're right, we will post a correction below.

ChapterPageDetailsDatePrint Run
2 52 Error in Code
Try it Out: The Dot Command.
The first "echo $version", "ion" should be bold
14-Oct-2015
55 Error in Text
Try It Out, section 2

Currently reads: ?export2?
Should read: ?./export2?
02/23/2012
55 Error in Text
In the ?How it works? section, second sentence:

HOW IT READS NOW:
...so when it subsequently invokes export1, the ...

HOW IT SHOULD READ:
...so when it subsequently invokes export2, the ...
12/28/2012
60 Error in Text
trap INT

Should be:

trap - INT
9/17/09
60 Error in Text
The executed script print out
-"press interrupt (CTRL-C) to interrupt ...."

Should be:
-"press interrupt (control-C) to interrupt ...."
03/21/2010
2 62 Text correction: Error in Options under "The find Command"
The third entry in the table of Options near the bottom of the page, -maxdepths N
Should read -maxdepth N
3/12/14
68 Error in Text
Section 4:

The line reading ?Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?? should be deleted

Or

Insert text:
the command 
$ grep -E [a-z]\{10\} words2.txt
should be replaced with
$ grep -E [A-Za-z]\{10\} words2.txt
02/23/2012
2 72 Text Correction: Error in Code
CURRENTLY READS:
bar
fud
usr/bin/X11/startx
startx
/usr/local/etc
/usr
SHOULD READ:
bar
fud
usr/bin/X11/startx
startx
/usr/local/etc/
/usr/
10/02/14
2 90 Error in Code
(a line of code in the first grey box on the page)
Currently reads:
num_tracks=$(wc -l $temp_file)
Should Read
num_tracks=$(wc -l <$temp_file)
17 June 2015
2 90 Error in Code
(a line of code in the first grey box on the page)
Currently reads:
num_tracks=$(wc -l $temp_file)
Should Read:
num_tracks=$(wc -l <$temp_file)
17 June 2015
94 Error in Text
Second paragraph in "Directories" section:

You can see the inode number for a file using ln -i.

Should be:

... using ls -i.
1/11/10
3 99 Error in Code
code snippet at the top:
46 should be 47
14-Oct-2015
142 Error in Text
Try It Out:
Text reading:
./longopt: invalid option -- q
should be deleted
02/23/2012
346 Error in Text
Try It Out:
The output from the SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID(); command is given as:
14
15

To be consistent with the previous sequence of steps and results in the text, should be:
12
13
02/23/2012
347 Error in Text
At the bottom of the page:
We inserted childno 6
We inserted childno 7

To be consistent with the sequence of steps and results in the text, this should be:
We inserted childno 14
We inserted childno 15
02/23/2012
363 Error in Text
The line:
= cd.id AND track.track_id < 3

Should be:
= cd.id AND track.track_id < 3;

If the MySQL Query Browser is used, the semi-colon is not needed. It is required for the command-line client.
02/23/2012
386 Error in Text
In the 3rd paragraph, the sentence:
Here you don't care too much about whether ensuring previous commands succeeded, so you can stick to the simpler form.
should be deleted.
02/23/2012
388-389 Error in Code
The code download for Makefile6 in chapter 9 contains some additional lines for managing rpm files and manual pages which are not mentioned in the book text or used by the examples in the book. These additional lines can be ignored.
02/23/2012
416 Error in Text
The sentences:
You can modify your earlier makefile, Makefile6, to add a new target to bundle the files into a tarball.
and
The final version of the makefile, simply called Makefile, follows:

should be replaced with:
You can modify your earlier makefile, Makefile5, to add a new target to bundle the files into a tarball.
and
The final version of the makefile, simply called Makefile, follows:
02/23/2012
487 Error in Code
About 2/3 down the page:

CURRENTLY READS:
void (*) (int) sa_handler

SHOULD READ:
void (*sa_handler)(int)
10/9/2013
Chapter 6 Code file Error in Code
In line 18 of the "chapter06/multiw1.c" source code file:
Currently reads:
refreshing the actual screen once the logical screen has been filled:
Should read:
refreshing the actual screen once the logical screen has been filled: */

Corrected file posted
02/23/2012
Chapter 7 Code file Error in Code
Line 42 of the chapter07/app/cd_data.h source code file:

Currently reads:
/* two for simple data retrival */
Should read:
/* two for simple data retrieval */
02/23/2012
625 Error in Code
CURRENTLY READS:
    if(argc == 1) {
        char myname[256];
        gethostname(myname, 255);
        host = myname;
    }


SHOULD READ:
    char myname[256];
    if(argc == 1) {
        gethostname(myname, 255);
        host = myname;
    }
3/26/2013
623 Error in Text
First paragraph

Currently reads:
"However, the local address (the server socket) is given as 1574 (or you may see mvel-lm as a service name), but the port chosen in the example is 9734. Why are they different? The answer is that port numbers and addresses are communicated over socket interfaces as binary numbers. Different computers use different byte ordering for integers. For example, an Intel processor stores the 32-bit integer as four consecutive bytes in memory in the order 1-2-3-4, where 1 is the most significant byte. IBM PowerPC processors would store the integer in the byte order 4-3-2-1. If the memory used for integers were simply copied byte-by-byte, the two different computers would not be able to agree on integer values."

Should read:
"However, the local address (the server socket) is given as 1574 (or you may see mvel-lm as a service name), but the port chosen in the example is 9734. Why are they different? The answer is that port numbers and addresses are communicated over socket interfaces as binary numbers. Different computers use different byte ordering for integers. For example, an IBM PowerPC processor stores the 32-bit integer as four consecutive bytes in memory in the order 1-2-3-4, where 1 is the most significant byte. Intel processors would store the integer in the byte order 4-3-2-1. If the memory used for integers were simply copied byte-by-byte, the two different computers would not be able to agree on integer values."
01/02/2014
40 Errata in Text
Grey tip box at top of page currently reads:

In general, if a loop should should always execute at least once, use a while loop; if it may not need to execute at all, use an until loop.

Should read:

In general, if a loop is expected to execute at least once use an until loop, if it may not need to execute at all use a while loop
05-Feb-16
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