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Professional Java EE Design Patterns (1118843584) cover image

Professional Java EE Design Patterns

Murat Yener, Alex Theedom, Reza Rahman (Foreword by)
ISBN: 978-1-118-84358-1
Wiley E-Text
264 pages
December 2014
Other Available Formats: Paperback
Electronic Version: US $32.99 Purchase This E-book and Learn More

About This Title  |  Errata
Table of Contents

FOREWORD xxiii

INTRODUCTION xxv

PART I: INTRODUCTION TO JAVA EE DESIGN PATTERNS

CHAPTER 1: A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF DESIGN PATTERNS 3

What Is a Design Pattern? 4

How Patterns Were Discovered and Why We Need Them 5

Patterns in the Real World 5

Design Pattern Basics 6

Enterprise Patterns 7

Java to Enterprise Java 7

The Emergence of Enterprise Java Patterns 8

Design Patterns Versus Enterprise Patterns 8

Plain Old Design Patterns Meet Java EE 9

When Patterns Become Anti‐Patterns 10

Summary 10

Notes 10

CHAPTER 2: THE BASICS OF JAVA EE 13

Multitier Architecture 14

The Client Tier 15

The Middle Tier 16

Web Layer 16

Business Layer 16

The EIS Tier 18

Java EE Servers 18

The Java EE Web Profile 18

Core Principles of Java EE 19

Convention over Configuration 19

Context and Dependency Injection 20

Interceptors 21

Summary 22

Exercises 22

PART II: IMPLEMENTING DESIGN PATTERNS IN JAVA EE

CHAPTER 3: FAÇADE PATTERN 25

What Is a Façade? 26

Façade Class Diagram 27

Implementing the Façade Pattern in Plain Code 27

Implementing the Façade Pattern in Java EE 29

Façade with Stateless Beans 29

Façade with Stateful Bean 31

Where and When to Use the Façade Pattern 31

Summary 31

Exercises 32

Notes 32

CHAPTER 4: SINGLETON PATTERN 33

What Is a Singleton? 34

Singleton Class Diagram 34

Implementing the Singleton Pattern in Plain Code 35

Implementing the Singleton Pattern in Java EE 38

Singleton Beans 39

Using Singletons at Startup 39

Determining Startup Order 40

Managing Concurrency 42

Where and When to Use the Singleton Pattern 45

Summary 46

Exercises 46

Notes 47

CHAPTER 5: DEPENDENCY INJECTION AND CDI 49

What Is Dependency Injection? 50

Implementing DI in Plain Code 50

Implementing DI in Java EE 53

The @Named Annotation 54

Context and Dependency Injection (CDI) 55

CDI Versus EJB 56

CDI Beans 56

The @Inject Annotation 57

Contexts and Scope 57

Naming and EL 58

CDI Beans for Backing JSF 58

Qualifi ers 59

Alternatives 59

Stereotypes 60

Other Patterns via CDI 60

Summary 61

Exercises 61

Notes 62

CHAPTER 6: FACTORY PATTERN 63

What Is a Factory? 64

Factory Method 64

Implementing the Factory Method in Plain Code 66

Abstract Factory 68

Implementing the Abstract Factory in Plain Code 69

Implementing the Factory Pattern in Java EE 70

Harness the Power of CDI 76

Where and When to Use the Factory Patterns 80

Summary 80

Exercises 81

Notes 81

CHAPTER 7: DECORATOR PATTERN 83

What Is a Decorator? 84

Decorator Class Diagram 85

Implementing the Decorator Pattern in Plain Code 86

Implementing the Decorator Pattern in Java EE 89

Decorators Without XML Confi guration 94

Where and When to Use the Decorator Pattern 94

Summary 95

Exercises 96

Notes 96

CHAPTER 8: ASPECT‐ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (INTERCEPTORS) 97

What Is Aspect‐Oriented Programming? 98

Implementing AOP in Plain Code 100

Aspects in Java EE, Interceptors 102

Interceptor Life Cycle 105

Default‐Level Interceptors 106

Interceptor Order 107

CDI Interceptors 109

Where and When to Use Interceptors 111

Summary 112

Notes 112

CHAPTER 9: ASYNCHRONOUS 113

What Is Asynchronous Programming? 114

Asynchronous Pattern 114

Implementing Asynchronous Pattern in Plain Code 116

Asynchronous Programming in Java EE 118

Asynchronous Beans 118

Asynchronous Servlets 120

Where and When to Use Asynchronous Programming 124

Summary 125

Exercises 125

Notes 126

CHAPTER 10: TIMER SERVICE 127

What Is the Timer Service? 127

Implementing a Timer in Java EE 130

Automatic Timers 130

Programmatic Timers 131

Timer Expression 134

Transactions 136

Summary 137

Exercises 137

Notes 138

CHAPTER 11: OBSERVER PATTERN 139

What Is an Observer? 139

Description 140

Observer Class Diagram 141

Implementing the Observer Pattern in Plain Code 142

Implementing the Observer Pattern in Java EE 144

Where and When to Use the Observer Pattern 149

Summary 150

Exercises 151

Notes 151

CHAPTER 12: DATA ACCESS PATTERN 153

What Is a Data Access Pattern? 154

Data Access Class Diagram 154

Overview of the Data Access Pattern 155

Data Transfer Object Pattern 155

Java Persistence Architecture API and Object Relational Mapping 156

Implementing the Data Access Pattern in Java EE 157

Type‐Safe DAO Implementation 162

Where and When to Use the Data Access Pattern 163

Summary 163

Exercises 163

Notes 163

CHAPTER 13: RESTFUL WEB SERVICES 165

What Is REST? 166

The Six Constraints of REST 167

Client‐Server 167

Uniform Interface 167

Stateless 168

Cacheable 168

Layered System 168

Code on Demand 168

Richardson Maturity Model of REST API 168

Level 0: The Swamp of POX (Plain Old XML) 169

Level 1: Resources 169

Level 2: HTTP Verbs 169

Level 3: Hypermedia Controls 169

Designing a RESTful API 169

Resource Naming 170

Nouns Not Verbs 170

Self‐Descriptive 170

Plural Not Singular 171

HTTP Methods 171

Get 171

Post 171

Put 172

Delete 172

Rest in Action 172

The users noun 172

The topics noun and the posts noun 173

Implementing REST in Java EE 175

HATEOAS 178

Where and When to Use REST 180

Summary 181

Exercises 181

Notes 182

CHAPTER 14: MODEL VIEW CONTROLLER PATTERN 183

What Is the MVC Design Pattern? 184

MVC Types 185

Implementing the MVC Pattern in Plain Code 186

Implementing the MVC Pattern in Java EE 190

The FacesServlet 190

MVC Using the FacesServlet 190

Where and When to Use the MVC Pattern 193

Summary 193

Exercises 193

Note 193

CHAPTER 15: OTHER PATTERNS IN JAVA EE 195

What Are WebSockets? 195

What Is Message‐Orientated Middleware 198

What Is the Microservice Architecture? 199

Monolithic Architecture 199

Scalability 200

Decomposing into Services 201

Microservice Benefi ts 202

Nothing in Life Is Free 203

Conclusions 204

Finally, Some Anti‐Patterns 204

Uber Class 204

Lasagna Architecture 204

Mr. Colombus 205

Friends with Benefi ts 205

Bleeding Edge 205

Utilityman 206

Notes 206

PART III: SUMMARY

CHAPTER 16: DESIGN PATTERNS: THE GOOD,THE BAD, AND THE UGLY 209

The Good: Patterns for Success 209

The Bad: Over and Misuse of Patterns 211

…and The Ugly 212

Summary 214

Notes 214

INDEX 215

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